3 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Planning for the New Year

Before planning for the new year, I like to reevaluate the previous year. I do this because it gets me to question just how efficient I am being with my time, money and energy. It’s not an easy task mind you, because it’s one where we must be TRULY honest with ourselves and it’s easy to make excuses. If however you can be direct in finding those answers, the benefits will far outweigh the slight discomfort. Moving forward you can really start to change the behaviours that are not working. I find it best to write these answers down starting with the question:

1. What did you set out to accomplish this year?

2. Why or why didn’t you achieve these goals?

3. How can you do differently moving forward?

 

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How To Be A Happier DJ

Are you waiting for success to bring you happiness? Well it should bring you some excitement to know that happiness actually brings on more success. So you don’t have to wait any longer. Nope. Actually the more you believe that you are in control of your life, the happier and more successful you can be. If this sounds like unicorns and magic potions read on. If it is not, then you probably know someone that could use this article, but feel free to read it anyways.

“You Validate Your Ideas By Pursuing Them” – Mel Robbins

1. Listen to music from the happiest time in your life

I took this straight from Eric Barker’s blog and for good reason. One, you’re a freaking DJ. Two, imagine how this effects others, too?! Some of my most popular mixes have had those ‘throwback’ tunes people loved from the 90’s or 2000s. It totally makes sense why people go wild at weddings and socials listening to the Spice Girls and other timeless music that reminds takes them back to a emotion in time. Cool thing is that neuroscience backs this idea.

2. Make Your Dreams Bigger Than Your Fears

It’s probably been quoted by more than a few celebrities at this point, but it really does work. I know for me, sometimes I find myself obsessing or stressing out one particular task, but when I shift my focus and think about the bigger goal I feel less fear about the hurdle ahead.

I grabbed this one from Eric Barkers blog about the happiest people having goals. He quoted this book.

Via Engineering Happiness: A New Approach for Building a Joyful Life:

“In his studies, the psychologist Jonathan Freedman claimed that people with the ability to set objectives for themselves—both short-term and long-term—are happier. The University of Wisconsin neuroscientist Richard Davidson has found that working hard toward a goal and making progress to the point of expecting a goal to be realized don’t just activate positive feelings—they also suppress negative emotions such as fear and depression.”

3. Let Go Of The Outcome

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There is only so much we can control in this world. When we let go of the things we can not control, we can find some peace. This is where you can refocus your energy on the things you can control. For example, I can’t control the weather. It might rain during one of my outdoor patio gigs. I can however bring tarps, have additional sound inside ready to go and a plan of action if we must make a quick change over.

On the topic of not being able to control things like people’s opinions of you, I chat here in a vlog about why you should probably keep doing the things people are making fun of you for. 

4. Remove the distractions that aren’t really helping you

You really can use laziness to your advantage. We are naturally drawn to things that are easier, not what actually makes us happier. The satisfaction out of creating and finishing a new mixtape feels wonderful. However staying at home and watching t.v. is easier and what a lot of us end up doing. So while starting that new tune seems like a lot of work when picking up your phone and checking facebook for the 30th time today may seem easier, in the end it’s not making you happier. It may be time to shut off that wifi or delete the apps that are distracting you, cancel the cable and have your music stuff ready to go, plugged in and right in your toolbar.

Want to figure out how to stop procrastinating? I dive more into that here.

How Much to Charge For a DJ Gig – Your Fee Calculator

Charging your worth, how much djs should charge

Have you ever wondered what exactly a fair fee might look like? Many artists make the mistake of agreeing to a gig before knowing exactly what is involved. From knowing the venue capacity and ticket price to HOW the event coordinator is marketing the event, other artists involved, and even the format. Asking questions and knowing this will help give you a good idea about their experience and what sort of budget they might be dealing with. Once gathering that information you can create a fair price on what it will cost for your services. These are the things things to considering before  calculating your final fee.

Your Personal Costs

If you must rent any equipment or purchase additional music by request of the party planner you can add this number into your overall fee. Asking questions will help you figure an estimate.

Your Hourly Worth

Maybe you feel you’re worth $40 an hour for your experience and expertise. You’ll need this number in order to calculate your fee. If you have been djing for a longer period of time, it’s fair to raise this number. It’s also fair if you have a larger following that will support the events you play.

Hours Spent

This is NOT just the 4 hours you are performing but the additional hours spent preparing your music, whether that is into folder or searching for specific music the event coordinator would like. Don’t forget to  add hours spent practicing.

NOTE: If the event coordination is incredibly specific about WHAT they are looking for and even take a more controlling approach to your dj set, you may want to tag on an additional fee as this can increase stress and it is always better taken with a price worth your time.

Add up your hours spent and times it by your hourly fee. Now add your additional fees for rental equipment and / or estimated music purchases  and you get = your fee.

Example:

Hours:
Preparing 3hr
Practicing 2hr
Performance 5hr
= 10 hr

Additional fees
Sound Rental $60
Beatport + iTunes  $80

10 hours x $40 hourly fee = $400 + additional fees $140 = $540.00

Why it Is important to charge your worth?

If a promoter offers you $150 to do a 5 hour dj set and you spend an additional 5 hours preparing, then supply your own gear and spend $50 on new music, suddenly you’re worth a whole $10.00 an hour. Less than minimal wage.

I am a true believer that in order to have the scene we’d like to see thrive we must act the part. Collectively that means we as djs need to RAISE our standards and ask for a fair wage. Knowing your worth is crucial to the growth of your personal business. In addition, the overall quality of our scene is at risk when quality artists undercut one another and even play for free; desperate to showcase their talent. Raising our fees as a collective would also mean the quality, experience and professionalism would too have to be on point for those getting booked. This would put low quality events to a minimal.

WorkaholicPartyStarted

Setting the industry standard

Right now, with the popularity of EDM  we are dealing with a lot of thrown together parties. They include mix-matched line ups and a lack of experience because it’s very affordable for people to throw together parties. This means quality events are sometimes missing out on clientele because there are far too many events to pick from creating sparse attendants across the board.

When you charge a fair fee, the risk may increase for the promoter, but so does the gain. It puts the promoter in a position where they must work harder create a budget for flyers, sound and promotion. Instead of depending on the artists to bring in their crowd, promote and sell tickets, they are left responsible for their own party planning. This way the artist is responsible for putting together a great dj set instead of stressing about ticket sales. Which is ultimately the djs job.

Related articles:

7 Reasons You Should NEVER DJ for Free
How NOT to Get Screwed By Sketchy Promoters
The Most Common Mistake DJs Make
How to Stand Out Among Other DJs

Grab your FREE DOWNLOAD of the Ultimate 2016 DJ Planner

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What is worse than the DJ Mag’s Top 100 DJs of 2014

TOP 100 DJ List Here

If you are familiar with the internet then you already know the answer to this question. Some how each year people forget that DJ Mag’s Top 100 DJs are based on votes by you guested it: The people. That’s you, me, your grandma. Pretty much anyone that took the time to participate. Yet each year a large amount of people are completely shocked and outraged. You may find your feed flooded with folks slamming various DJs while others are sharing who their top picks would have been.

Boiler Room .Gifs

We as people are really good at looking at the most negative things and then focusing on them for days, sometimes weeks. Some of us are so good are letting something that doesn’t directly effect us bother us, we turn it into the bane of our existence.

What about celebrating the few artist that sneaked by or some wonderful accomplishments during the year? Is there room for them?

Predictable facebook and twitter feed for the week that follows:

“This is what’s wrong with the world.”
“DJ SuckerPunch must have slept with someone to get on this list…”
“This is why I stopped DJing.”
“These are all the excuses I use because I don’t really want to try any harder. It’s too much work and easier to be the outraged victim.”

Wait, what?

Could you imagine if the guy at work got a promotion and you just up and quit your job to go do something completely different. I mean you’ve been there longer and he got the promotion instead of you. He must be sleeping with someone. Because that’s how businesses function right? WRONG. At least not the ones you want to work in.  For some making those accusation leave the idea that the person saying them may be insecure with their abilities.

Be Curious!

Are you cut out for the job? Are you working to your full potential? If we broke it down and looked at the artists that made it how do you think it is that someone that get’s so much hate is being so hyped up on these lists? What are they are doing right?

Kilma, what are you getting at?

So maybe you’re still stuck in your way of thinking and all of this sounds completely crazy. but think about this. We are all given the same amount of hours in a day. We witness people from all different back rounds, rich, poor, poverty exceeding expectations or even becoming completely broke after starting out rich. And what about those celebrities that made it big and their careers took a turn for the worse ending up penniless? Or the ones that had nothing and made something great of themselves. What was that key factor? What was their trick for success?

Ask, Believe and Receive.

What I am saying is that we all have the ability to exceed our expectations but we have to put the time, energy and work into our craft. It wont happen over night and it wont be an easy road. And keep in mind that everyone views succeed as something different. Maybe being the on the DJ Mag Top 100 isn’t one of yours. Maybe it’s becoming a Radio Host on BBC Radio 1Xra or a success Label owner. If your downfall is someone else reaching a goal, you may just be the very reason you’re being held back from your dreams. When have to stop making excuses and start asking how we are going to make it happen for ourselves things start happening.

The only thing holding you back from your dreams is YOU.

Now take a chill pill, watch this video and think about the great things that happened in 2014 including how even SNL was able to make fun of how popular some genres in EDM became.

The truth about landing Artist Representation with Founder of Cyber Groove Scott McCusker.

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Looking for an Artist Management company but don’t know who to talk to or how to get noticed? Who better than the professionals to explain the ins and outs of artist management. I ask Scott McCusker the founder of Cyber Groove and he gives some surprising answers and advice on the matter.

StateofMind

State Of Mind

Before we get into it, what exactly is Artist Management? What do you do? What can an artist expect?

Thank you for the introduction Kilma, and hope I can provide your reading audience with some sort of value.

With this question it is better just to introduce all the different roles that work with artists to fulfill their end goals. There are managers, agents, and then Public Relations / Press people.

A manager works with an artist to present them with opportunities in order to organically build a fan base with them so their career can flourish. Managers also review all in coming booking opportunities from Agents to make sure it is a good fit for the artist, and they will also review all other business dealings such as contract negotiations.

Agents facilitate the bookings for a given artist using their existing demand. Also an agent will present that artist to promoters and talent buyers in the attempt to get shows even if they are not known in that given area.

Public Relations and Press people publicize all of these opportunities, and bookings so more fans and connections can be created.

If an artist has all of these people on board and has actual talent and everyone does the work they aren’t guaranteed a successful career but they should do pretty damn good.

I am both an agent and a manager, although I do not manage and act as an agent for the same artists. This would not be in their best interest.

Within my primary role of an agent I work with promoters mainly throughout North America and put artists onto shows. In the management role I set up short term goals with my artists and we work together to achieve them. The goal is to build as many fans and connections as possible so we can transition them from our management to our agency or shop them to a more suited agency if we do not line up with their career path.

In general, getting a manager or an agent, an artist can expect a lot of work. I become a member of a team when I work with artists. I don’t carry the weight of everything, this isn’t realistic. If an artist lives in the studio when he isn’t popular then he will remain this way. All you need is 1,000 loyal fans and you have yourself a career. However, engagement is the way to capture these people so you must be out there. The music is important but when you hit play, who is listening?

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Prolix

  • If you have artist representation the tours will start rolling in:

Obtaining a manager or an agent does not mean that you will start to get shows right off the bat. Getting shows is based on the demand a given artist has and how many asses you can put in seats. Will getting an agent help? Yea sure since the promoters we work with usually trust us so when we speak a new name to them, they will listen. If it is a local agency to you then the chances for more local shows are pretty much guaranteed,  but I am referring to regional or national touring placement.

Having a top chart tunes helps you land more bookings:

Top charting tunes do matter, but more so just to validate your abilities. This is where your manager or PR people come in. They will be able to take this and shop your tunes onto larger labels or work out collaborations with established artists and then that’s really when things start to happen because naturally your reach will be larger therefore more fans will be in existence. Also promoters who can market effectively can present you in a better light since you have become marketable.

  • If you get signed to a big label, artist management companies are jumping for the opportunity to represent you:

This used to be the case, all of us industry folk used to find artists using the Beatport Top 10. We would bring artists on and work with them and that was great while it existed. Then all of a sudden it didn’t matter anymore since the system was a bit flawed. Now you can’t tell what’s what anymore. For promotional use though, it is great.

  • You don’t need a strong online presences to get quality gigs. (Social Media isn’t that important.)

Social media is important however, it goes back to fans and demand. If your social media follows and likes are paid for then those likes or follows from China or India isn’t going to help you. Social media is so you can be social with your following. What you should be doing is engaging them and bring them all off line (ie. Email list / Blog). Still to this day, promoters do look at these numbers and I do have artists who get passed up because of artists who have these inflated numbers. An artist shouldn’t want to work with that kind of promoter right?

  • If you are really talented someone will discover you. Ie: Artist, Promoters, Labels, Management Companies

If you are super talented in time you will be noticed because heat rises right? However this goes back to the artist who just sits in the studio, if no work is being done on the brand or to capture fans then even the most connected agent or manager won’t have much to use in order to get you out there. So for those artists who are super talented and just don’t have any business experience I am sure you can find someone to help you. If your music moves people, finding help is just a question away.

Zardonica

What are some other misconceptions?

There are really no misconceptions, just people who don’t know the roles well enough to know how to split up the work or responsibilities. I get artists who tell me I don’t promote their releases enough. I have to remind them I am their agent so they should look into getting a person in PR. We promote our artists since all content of our artists will help in the booking process but outside of Facebook, Twitter, and our mailing lists there we just can’t help with. Then I have artists who want to get into other areas of this business and they come to me on why this isn’t happening. I suggest for them to get a manager. An agent does one thing, get an artist gigs. Gigs now of days will be the most consistent source of income an artist can get.

What are your pet peeves working in this scene? (Promoters with no response/refusal or contacts/deposits.

Pet peeves, oh Kilma, don’t get me started. In this business there is a 10% response rate and that is after the 4th follow up. So yea that is probably the big one. In my eyes, it is rude not to respond to people who spent the time to generate an email to you, or pick up the phone. My advice to those who ignore emails and phone calls is to “Grow a Pair”. Say “No, Thank You”. If that is your answer I am able to move on to the next person who may want to work with me. The second is the question, “How Much?” Stay tuned for the guide I wrote up about this whole topic, I’ll share it with you once I am done with the design.

freakyflow

Freaky Flow

Before we move into advice you have for artists, tell us a bit about Cyber Groove. What you offer that is unique from others companies and how you continue to stand apart.

Cyber Groove deals primarily within bass music (Drum and Bass, Dubstep, Electro). We dabble in house as well pretty much if it’s a great sound and it moves me emotionally and appeals to my promoter public we can work with it. We have been around since October 2000 starting out as a NYC promoter company. After we got over the promotional bug, we went into the agency game.

How I believe we are different from other agencies is the quality control on all sides of our business. We get back in touch within 24hrs, we give every promoter at all levels an opportunity to work with us, we represent great positive people (I have a unwritten no s**t head clause on my artist agreement) that are extremely talented. Most important we work with promoters to ensure that every step of the process is on point and that their shows are successful. We are authentic and we do what is right. Not everything is about making the quick buck, we are not in the business to put promoters out of business.

KilmaVibebannerKilma

Back story: When I was looking for representation what made you decide I was the right fit for Cyber Groove AM?

Kilma, you appealed to us because you are marketable, talented, and persistent. I like artists with a hustle to them since that is a key trait of a successful artist. Those who sit back and wait for things that happen usually don’t make it.

What advice do you have for artists looking for representation? How can they put themselves on your radar?

Do your ground work and start to build yourself up locally. It is better to approach an agency when you have something to show. If you have a number of tunes signed to mid-level labels then maybe it is time to reach out to a manager or a PR person to see about building up your name in your area. With this you will most likely get bookings and you can take it from there. If you can do it in one city, the chances of bleeding over into other scenes should be easy. Once you can take on a region, then it might be agency time. Agencies really don’t look out for artists all the time; they usually fall into our laps. Artists do this by having someone we know directly get in touch with us about that artist, or they just get in touch with us directly.

Where do you see Cyber Groove in a year from today? 5 years?

I would say in a year, we should have our agency pretty well sorted with an active touring schedule for a majority of our artists. Our management roster should also be pretty strong as well. In this business you have to take it, day by day, so I can’t even forecast accurately. Watch our journey!

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Anything else?

Keep in touch with us! Get on our Facebook (http://www.Facebook.com/cybergrooveprod), Twitter (@cybergroove), website (http://www.CyberGrooveAM.com), and our blog (http://cybergrooveprod.wordpress.com). We will also be forming a Podcast soon enough and the home for that will be http://www.CyberGrooveRadio.com. Thank you Kilma for giving us a place to spread our message #BeSimple

What is EDM?

I’m about to tell you what EDM is and why I think everyone could stand to LEARN what type of music they are really listening to.

“EDM? Is it that thing with the bass, and then the drop?” All you know really know is that “you can feel it in your veins!” Chances are if you’ve said that in ear shot of an Electronic music Dj that has been in the scene for 10+ years, they are probably cringing. Don’t feel bad, we were you at one point and probably shouldn’t judge either. To this day the well rounded person into loads of different music can have difficulty categorizing the many possible and ever changing genres and their sub-genres.

So what is it?

EDM stands for Electronic Dance Music.

Yes thats right, its not Electric it is Electronic. Don’t worry we thought it was cute when you said that. It’s a description of all of electronic music you listen to, not just one.

“But how do I explain such a wide range of music to my friends?” You ask.

Imagine EDM as an umbrella and under that are all of its genres and sub-genres.

Having a hard time wraping that one around your head? This website that helped me when I was getting into dance music was this one: EDM GUIDE

Things about other genres you already know, like hip and country music.

You wouldn’t call it Rap music if it was RnB or HipHop.

You wouldn’t call it Metal if it was really Punk or Alternative.

There for Techno is NOT Drum and Bass or Electro. It is it’s own category under the wide description of (Electronic Dance Music) or as you know it “EDM.”

What Is EDM?

We are describing dance music with wide assortment of electronically made music at various BPMs (beats per minute) produced and manipulated with all sorts of production programs, synths and different plug ins.

Under that broad description of electronic music you have the genres: EDM GUIDE

House, Trance, Techno, Breakbeats, Jungle, Hardcore and Downtempo

As you break down each genre into its sub-genres you realize that deep house and speed garage are still a form of house music. You notice that techno varies from progressive and minimal to euro, detroit and even tribal.

The Guide to Electronic Dance Music website even gives you a bit of history about each genre. A bit out dated and wont have genre’s like Big Room or Trap, but you get the idea around it.

Did you think you were rolling in those deep basslines when it first came out and was all the rage? Opps! That genre of music has been around yeas before you were born. You could literally hear a tune from 15 years ago and it would sound brand spanking NEW today. Why? Because 1. you’ve never heard it 2. often the music of today is the recycled music of yesterday.

Am I blowing your mind yet?

You maybe feeling silly for calling drum and bass, techno or dubstep music electro-house but now you are equipped with a little more information that will make you slightly smarter then all of your friends. Just don’t abuse that power.

Just be grateful you no longer have to sound like the poor kids in this video.

If you`ve read the chart and are still confused about what music you are listening to don`t fret. Shazam it and save it for later. (Instructions coming soon keep reading.)

Please don’t feel ashamed that you`ve told people the wrong genre because you simply didn’t know. Chances are, they never did either!

The simple reply, “If it makes me move and I can’t help but groove, its good music.” will do.

So why should you care to know what sort of music you are listening to?

Now the really fun part starts. Take the time and try to learn about the tunes you love the most and find out just what genre you are listening to. Search for other artists and labels putting out those types of tracks. Having that little extra bit of knowledge is:

1. A Great conversation starter

2. A way to impress your friends and or that guy/girl you’ve been crushing on.

Think about all of those amazing tracks you will stumble across you may never have found otherwise. You will be the talk of the party when you are showing everyone all these great new tracks you’ve discovered. (Okay, maybe only a few people will appreciate it but they’ll be the friends worth having.)

WARNING:

Just beware that no one likes a music snob. If you walk in the room and someone thinks that they are listening to trance and you laugh at them and say, “Oh my gosh, this is progressive-electro-house with synthesis.” You’re just being a dick. Offer some history, a story if you’d like to educate your friends if you like. It’s not about showing people up, it is about empowering and learning while enjoying some really great music. At least if it’s “about the music” for you we hope it is!

Go off into the world baby bird and discover something new and exciting!

But wait, don’t you want to know what Techno REALLY sounds like? Here is a classic example, “One Night in Hackney – Dave The Drummer and Chris Liberator.” A perfect introduction to techno with a story of a young man that visited london for the first time… as luck would have it he was exposed to loads of drugs and techno music.

There are many forms of techno that are not as “in your face” but like I tell my friends. “If you heard some TECHNO, you’d probably know because it would sound like there was a train coming through your house.”

Just incase you wanted some more.


Use The Promo Code: DONTKILMAVIBE for $100 OFF EDM TRIP in THAILAND

What happened to DJ SW@T?

If you know me, you know I am into loads of different music. I was originally turned on to Drum and Bass music from the start. I liked the fast paced sounds, and how it was influenced by so many other genres. From that dub and reggae sound to a more ambient and soulful feel.

I was lucky enough to work with Viper Recording’s producer Inside Info. We released two tracks “Awkward” and “Bottled” and ended up filming my first music video for “Bottled.”

There were definitely situations that made me ask myself a lot of questions about the scene and how women were viewed in it. Something that probably sounds ridiculous to so many considering the rights we have in our country but it was something more and more women had brought to my attention over the years. Situations that came to light as I experience abuse and harassment. This was actually one of the reasons I was inspired to create the Drum and Bass Girls of Canada in 2009. I created with my sisters a roster of strong women across North America in Drum and Bass ready to strengthen our brands while working together in support and motivation.

I talked about the differences in a very important interview I did with Girls on Decks. It really forced me to reflect on everything I had been through and what I was feeling in the present. It was lovely to get it out there, as typically it wasn’t something I enjoyed talking about.

I dabbled into other electronic music genres like dubstep and electro but I found myself back into house and techno music each time.

Before fully switching over, I worked with local artists Tripwave on a tune, “Feel it” featuring my vocals. An elaborated music video came out of that production directed and produced by Cory Quinn. It’s was the craziest two days of filming, not sure where I got the energy from but by the end of it I was dead to the world. The end result, one amazing video.

Once realizing my new niche I quickly saw how SW@T was heavily  known in the drum and bass community and now dubstep community with “Whispers – Biome feat. SW@T” radio 1 play.  It occurred that my new interest in music was lost on many fans and people that had come to know the name SW@T. It was time to make that clean break and move on in a new light.

Around came Kilma. The name Kilma is from this old 70’s movie. It’s super weird like most of the movies from that era… like Barberella. None the less is reminded me of my jungle roots since she was an women of the amazon and was a part of a tribe of women that ran the island. It just bought me right back to the empowerment of women. Her tribe was all female and women ran the world.

As I started playing with the word I ended up with some fun tag lines, like “Don’t Kilma Vibe” and “Kilma Tempa.” It was somewhat fitting considering my old tag line was, “Don’t F#%$ with SW@T.” On the outside it sounded like some super angry person, but really it was always about taking care of business. Like any professional you’ve got to get things done.

I dropped everything, my old alias, the music and started from scratch again. As opportunity would have it, I was able to re-brand in the Jungle as Kilma. How fitting, eh? I was given the chance to play out in Costa Rica in February of 2014. I made great new friends, saw a part of the world I’d never been to and got to play one of the most beautiful Envision Festival. It was quite the intense experience and I will never forget what knowledge I took from that trip.

When I returned home I was buzzing with different ideas, I couldn’t wait to get started. I got back in touch with a friend,Chris Tweten aka Tweten Online. He is the social media genius of Winnipeg, working in the Ramp Up Manitoba space with like minded entrepreneurs. I knew that if I wanted to make a real impact this time around, I needed to be working with people that could offer what I could not. The idea of #BrandMeSilly came to me because I always had loads of people asking me questions about branding and promoting themselves. I wanted to take those bits of advice and turn it into real knowledge that when used properly people could monetize from. With the help of Tweten Online we were able to come up with workshop to help strengthen our local community.

Another project that I started up some months ago with the Re-Brand is “The Basement Sessions.” It’s a live stream radio show that happens each Saturday evening on UStream.TV. It’s loads of fun and I get to share this show with my friends both locally and across the globe. People tune in, watch, get in the chat room and we get to be interactive, silly and enjoy one another’s company.

I think my most favourite part of the re-brand is the fresh start. It’s a very different scene of people and environment. My goal was to work with people looking for a new, exciting, and different experience. With so many DJs to choose from now a days it’s easy to get lost in opinions. With me, they knew I was going to be different from the average DJ and cater to a different crowd.

To me, djing it like dating. If you meet someone new and try to be who you think they would be into instead of just being you, you’ll end up with someone that likes the phony you. If you dj music you don’t like, that will show too. I think in order to get your own crowd of people you have to stop worrying about catering to “the people” and start worrying about pleasing yourself. The people that dig your sounds will come around.